21 October 2012

Annual Report 2012

2012 Annual Report for the year ended June 30 2012.

19 July 2012

Grant Recipients 2012

In 2012, grants were awarded to the following recipients:

Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, University of Toronto
A universal development platform for the BBDMR

Alexandre Douplik, Ryerson University
Surface enhanced Raman fiber sensor for endoscopic early detection of tumor-related biomolecules in gastroenterology

Carl Ernst, McGill University
Functional analysis of the 16p11.2 locus using patient-derived induced-pluripotent stem cells

Dennis Jensen, McGill University
Banting Research Foundation/ Rx&D Health Research Foundation Award
Physiological mechanisms of dyspnea relief and improved exercise tolerance after treatment with oral morphine in patients with advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Martin Lévesque, Université Laval
Molecular mechanisms of axon guidance mediated by PlexinC1 in dopamine neurons axonal projections

Michelle Scott, Université de Sherbrooke
Banting Research Foundation/ Rx&D Health Research Foundation Award
Characterization of a novel function of small RNAs in alternative splicing

18 July 2012

Alexandre Douplik, PhD

Physics Department, Ryerson University

Surface-enhanced Raman fiber sensor for endoscopic early detection of tumor-related biomolecules in gastroenterology

The goal of the project is development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy fiber probes for high sensitive and rapid non-invasive diagnostics including malignancy detection. Optical sampling of biological molecules can detect specific Raman “fingerprints” including cancer “signatures” with high accuracy. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2012

Carl Ernst, PhD

Department of Psychiatry, McGill University

Functional analysis of the 16p11.2 locus using patient-derived induced-pluripotent stem cells

Large deletions of DNA on chromosome 16 are associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in about 1% of all Canadians with autism, and many more Canadians with intellectual disability. I have recruited and clinically assessed two independent families carrying the chromosome 16 deletion as well as unrelated control subjects. I have made, fully characterized, and validated stem cells from each family member, derived from their skin. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2012

Dennis Jensen, PhD

Department of Kinesiology & Physical Education, McGill University

Physiological mechanisms of dyspnea relief and improved exercise tolerance after treatment with oral morphine in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive disease of the lungs and airways, causing shortness of breath (dyspnea) and exercise intolerance. Conventional efforts to alleviate these symptoms have focused on dilating the airways (eg, bronchodilators), reducing the drive to breathe (eg, supplemental oxygen), or both of these in combination. Nevertheless, many COPD patients remain incapacitated by dyspnea and intolerant to exercise, despite receiving optimal therapy for management of their disease. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2012

Martin Lévesque, PhD

Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Université Laval

Molecular mechanisms of axon guidance mediated by PlexinC1 in dopamine neuron axonal projections

Lévesque lab research image

Midbrain explant containing dopaminergic neurons growing in collagen gel matrix. This assay is used to study the response of growing axons to guidance molecules.

Degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons (mDA) is the principal cause of Parkinson’s disease. Grafts of dopaminergic neurons newly generated from stem cells represent a promising therapeutic avenue. However, inappropriate re-innervation of the grafted neurons represents a major factor limiting success in transplantation studies. Our previous work has identified PlexinC1 as a potential important candidate that mediates appropriate innervation of dopaminergic axons. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2012

Michelle Scott, PhD

Department of Biochemistry, Université de Sherbrooke

Characterization of a novel function of small RNAs in alternative splicing

Michelle Scott

Michelle Scott, recipient of a 2012 Banting Research Foundation grant

The process of alternative splicing allows the production of multiple distinct proteins from a single gene, in a manner that can be cell-type specific. Alternative splicing requires an extensive and complex regulation. Diverse human diseases can be caused by mutations resulting in splicing deregulation including cystic fibrosis, progeria, spinal muscular atrophy, and many forms of cancer, highlighting the importance of a comprehensive understanding of this regulation. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

Banting Research Foundation
Founded in 1925 by supporters of Frederick Banting,
1923 Nobel laureate for the discovery of insulin


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