20 July 2013

Grant Recipients 2013

Pierre Lozach and team at the Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier

Pierre-Yves Lozach, recipient of a 2013 Banting Research Foundation grant, and his team at Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier

In 2013, grants were awarded to the following recipients:

Craig Bailey, University of Guelph
Nicotinic receptor signaling in a mouse model of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

David Chatenet, Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier
Design and synthesis of peptide inhibitors of PqsE as novel antibacterial therapeutics

Margaret K Hahn, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Central insulin to prevent olanzapine-induced adiposity: a rodent model

Pierre-Yves Lozach, Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier
Bunyavirus entry into mammalian cells

Dave Richard, Université Laval
Protein trafficking to the apical complex of the malaria parasite

Marie-Ève Tremblay, Université Laval
Microglial relationships with synaptic elements in Alzheimer’s disease

18 July 2013

Craig Bailey, PhD

Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Guelph

Nicotinic receptor signaling in a mouse model of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Neurons

Neurons

Chronic prenatal exposure to alcohol can produce a spectrum of adverse effects known collectively as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Although deficits in attention rank among the most common and persistent components of FASD, mechanisms underlying this behavioural outcome are not known. This project aims to determine mechanisms by which exposure to alcohol during development alters the brain’s attention systems. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2013

David Chatenet, PhD

Centre INRS–Institut Armand-Frappier

Design and synthesis of peptide inhibitors of PqsE as novel antibacterial therapeutics

David Chatenet with lab members

David Chatenet, recipient of a 2013 Banting Research Foundation grant, with lab colleagues at Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier. (Photo: Christian Fleury)

Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), a prevalent opportunistic human pathogen responsible for morbidity and mortality among individuals suffering from cystic fibrosis, is notorious for its high resistance to antibiotic treatments. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2013

Margaret K Hahn, MD, PhD

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Central insulin to prevent olanzapine-induced adiposity: a rodent model

Portrait of Margaret Hahn, 2013

Margaret K Hahn, recipient of a 2013 Banting Research Foundation grant

Atypical antipsychotic (AAP) medications, the mainstay treatment for psychosis and schizophrenia, are defined by weight gain and metabolic problems that likely contribute to a 2-fold increase in cardiovascular (CV) deaths in this population. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2013

Pierre-Yves Lozach, PhD

Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier

Bunyavirus entry into mammalian cells

Lozach Lab viral particles image

Lozach Lab image of viral particles (red = virus and green = cell membrane)

Bunyaviridae is a large family of viruses mainly transmitted by arthropods such as mosquitos and ticks. Many bunyaviruses are important pathogens in humans and livestock. Due to their mode of transmission, they are considered emerging agents of diseases. Unfortunately, bunyaviruses are understudied, which has contributed to an absence of treatments or vaccines approved for human use. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2013

Dave Richard, PhD

Département de microbiologie-infectiologie et d’immunologie, Université Laval

Protein trafficking to the apical complex of the malaria parasite

Richard Lab malaria cells image

Malaria merozoite in the process of invading a red blood cell, imaged using super resolution microscopy. Published in Cell Host and Microbe, 2011.

Malaria is one of the world’s most common infectious diseases, with approximately 274 million cases each year and 1 million deaths, and thus represents one of the most devastating global public health problems. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2013

Marie-Ève Tremblay, PhD

Département de médecine moléculaire, Université Laval

Microglial relationships with synaptic elements in Alzheimer’s disease

Tremblay Lab research image

Dynamic interactions between microglia (in yellow) and dendritic spines (in green), as imaged in real-time in vivo. Each frame was taken 5 minutes apart. The spines contacted by the microglial processes are shown by the white arrowheads, and those which are non-contacted by the red arrowheads. The scale bar corresponds to 5 microns. (Tremblay ME, Lowery RL, and Majewska AK (2010) Microglial interactions with synapses are modulated by visual experience. PLoS Biology 8:e1000527)

A series of recent discoveries have challenged our view of microglia, the brain immune cells, showing unexpected roles in the active maintenance of neuronal circuits throughout the lifespan. Contributing to this nascent field of investigation, this project aims at exploring the relevance of these new roles in Alzheimer’s disease, the most common cause of dementia affecting over 35 million people worldwide. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

16 July 2013

Dr Tara Moriarty receives an operating grant from CIHR

“The [Banting Research Foundation] grant was essential to the survival and development of my research lab at a very difficult time of funding, and has enabled us to perform key experiments required to obtain more sustained research support.”

Research is an investment in the future, and the progress of our recent grantees is a result of this investment. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

Banting Research Foundation
Founded in 1925 by supporters of Frederick Banting,
1923 Nobel laureate for the discovery of insulin


Copyright © 2017 Banting Research Foundation


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