Jennifer Heisz, PhD

Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University

Examining the dose-response relationship between physical exercise and cognitive function in older adults

Jennifer Heisz talks about her research at a recent Canadian Foundation for Innovation funding announcement (Photo: Ron Scheffler)

Jennifer Heisz talks about her research at a recent Canadian Foundation for Innovation funding announcement (Photo: Ron Scheffler)

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, causing severe cognitive impairment and interfering with daily life. As the population ages, the number of Canadians living with dementia is projected to double within a generation to affect 1.1 million people and cost Canada‚Äôs healthcare system in excess of $150 billion.

Jennifer Heisz, recipient of a 2014 Banting Research Foundation Discovery Award

Jennifer Heisz, recipient of a 2014 Banting Research Foundation Discovery Award

There is urgent need for intervention to reduce the burden of dementia on Canadian families and the economy. The proposed research will develop evidence-based economical and practical exercise interventions to improve brain function in seniors. Exercise programs engaged at critical stages will extend autonomy and improve quality of life, and ultimately keep more aging Canadians healthier for longer.

Update: See Dr Heisz speak on CTV’s Canada AM (Jan 21, 2015) about how exercise reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Banting Research Foundation
Founded in 1925 by supporters of Frederick Banting,
1923 Nobel laureate for the discovery of insulin


Copyright © 2017 Banting Research Foundation


Log in
Website development by RNA Studio
Powered by WordPress & Atahualpa