16 February 2017

Banting Research Foundation grants for early-career investigators – deadline March 15

The Banting Research Foundation Discovery Award grants up to $25,000 to outstanding new investigators in all areas of health and biomedical research who are within the first three years of their independent appointment at a university or research institute in Canada. The intent is to provide seed funding so that applicants are able to gather pilot data to enhance their competitiveness for other sources of funding. This competition is open to new investigators at any Canadian university or affiliated research institute who will be within the first three years of the date of their first career academic appointment at the application deadline date of March 15, 2017.

See full guidelines here.

Some of our Discovery Awards are co-funded by other organizations. These partnered awards are in addition to our usual 5-6 awards granted each year. In 2017, funding partners include the Rick Hansen Institute, Dystonia Medical Research Foundation Canada, and the McLaughlin Foundation at the University of Toronto.

Applications for these partnered awards go through the same review process as all other applications for the Discovery Award, and are scored and ranked with the others. Only those rated in the fundable category (outstanding – 4.5-4.9; excellent – 4.0-4.4) will be considered for funding. Applicants must meet all eligibility requirements of our Discovery Award program (see guidelines), and, in addition, must show relevance to the partner organization’s areas of research focus. Keywords and clear statements about relevance in the application will be used to determine consideration for a partnered award. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

7 February 2017

Applying for partnered Discovery Awards

Some of our Discovery Awards are co-funded by other organizations. These partnered awards are in addition to our usual 5-6 awards granted each year. In 2017, funding partners include the Rick Hansen Institute, Dystonia Medical Research Foundation Canada, and the McLaughlin Foundation at the University of Toronto.

Applications for these partnered awards go through the same review process as all other applications for the Discovery Award, and are scored and ranked with the others. Only those rated in the fundable category (outstanding – 4.5-4.9; excellent – 4.0-4.4) will be considered for funding. Applicants must meet all eligibility requirements of our Discovery Award program (see guidelines), and, in addition, must show relevance to the partner organization’s areas of research focus. Keywords and clear statements about relevance in the application will be used to determine consideration for a partnered award. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

6 February 2017

Banting Research Foundation/ McLaughlin Centre Discovery Award

The Banting Research Foundation and the University of Toronto McLaughlin Centre are pleased to announce a two-year funding partnership to support research by early career investigators focused on areas relevant to genomic medicine.

The goals of the McLaughlin Centre’s research program are to support new research projects in genomic medicine emphasizing excellence; to educate clinicians, scientists, and health care professionals in genomic medicine; to initiate and promote inter-institutional research activities between McLaughlin Centre partners; to build an enterprise of the highest international reputation and brand; and to ensure the Toronto health-research community leads Canada and the world in delivering 21st-century genomic medicine.

The Banting Research Foundation/ McLaughlin Centre Discovery Award is a one-year grant of up to $25,000 per year that will support research related to genomic medicine, defined as the diagnosis, prognosis, prevention and/or treatment of disease and disorders of the mind and body, using approaches informed by knowledge of the diploid genome and the molecules it encodes.

The Banting Research Foundation/ McLaughlin Centre Discovery Award will be awarded through the grant program of the Banting Research Foundation. Eligible applicants must be in the first three years of an academic appointment at the University of Toronto or its affiliated hospitals and their research institutes. For complete guidelines and application instructions, see:
bantingresearchfoundation.ca/grants/guidelines/

Application deadline: March 15, 2017 READ THE WHOLE STORY »

25 January 2017

Banting Research Foundation Discovery Award supported by Dystonia Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) Canada

The Banting Research Foundation and Dystonia Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) Canada are pleased to announce a two-year funding partnership to support research by early career investigators focused on areas relevant to dystonia, a neurological movement disorder impacting more than 50,000 Canadians.

The goal of the DMRF Canada’s Science Program is to support the discovery of new or improved therapies and, ultimately, a cure for dystonia. To achieve this goal, the DMRF is dedicated to supporting the field of dystonia research and stimulating the collaborations and projects necessary to accelerate progress.

The Banting Research Foundation Discovery Award supported by DMRF Canada is a one-year grant of up to $25,000 per year that will support research related to the causes, mechanisms, prevention, and treatments which could potentially enable medical breakthroughs and transformative health care advances to find a cure for dystonia.

Eligible candidates must be focused on research that will address one or more of the core directions necessary to advance the field of dystonia. These core directions include furthering our fundamental understanding of dystonia, uncovering the mechanisms in the nervous system that lead to symptoms, creating experimental models of dystonia, and discovering targets for new and improved therapeutics designed specifically to treat dystonia. This includes hypothesis-driven research projects at the genetic, molecular, cellular, systems, or behavioral levels that may lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology or to new therapies for any or all forms of dystonia.

The Banting Research Foundation Discovery Award supported by DMRF Canada will be awarded through the grant program of the Banting Research Foundation with input from the DMRF Medical Advisory Committee. Eligible applicants must be in the first three years of an academic appointment at a university or research institute in Canada. For complete guidelines and application instructions, see:
bantingresearchfoundation.ca/grants/guidelines/.

Application deadline: March 15, 2017 READ THE WHOLE STORY »

31 December 2016

Annual Report 2016

2016 Annual Report for the year ended June 30 2016

22 December 2016

Banting Research Foundation/ Rick Hansen Institute Discovery Award

The Banting Research Foundation and the Rick Hansen Institute are pleased to announce a funding partnership to support research by early career investigators focused on areas relevant to spinal cord injury (SCI).

The human and economic costs of SCI are devastating.  For the 86,000 Canadians who have spinal cord injuries, life is changed forever.  SCI costs the Canadian economy more than $2.7 Billion annually, in health care costs and lost productivity.

The Banting Research Foundation/ Rick Hansen Institute Discovery Award is a one-year grant of up to $25,000 that will support research which could potentially enable medical breakthroughs and transformative health care advances to reduce the human and economic costs associated with SCI. Eligible candidates must be focused on research in one or more of the following areas relevant to SCI: paralysis, pressure ulcers, urinary tract infections, neuropathic pain, predictive preclinical models of evaluation, and spinal cord injury in Indigenous Peoples in Canada. Eligibility is not limited to those specializing in the field of SCI, but the research must be applicable to SCI. The Banting Research Foundation/ Rick Hansen Institute Discovery Award will be awarded through the grant program of the Banting Research Foundation.

Eligible applicants must be in the first three years of an academic appointment at a university or research institute in Canada. For complete guidelines and application instructions, see: bantingresearchfoundation.ca/grants/guidelines/

Application deadline: March 15, 2017 READ THE WHOLE STORY »

16 December 2016

2016 Friesen Prize Program

Dr Janet Rossant, 2016 Friesen Prize winner

Janet Rossant, CC, PhD, FRS, FRSC, 2016 Friesen Prize winner (Photo: Martin Lipman/FCIHR)


The Banting Research Foundation sponsored the 2016 Friesen Prize program, where Dr Janet Rossant was awarded the Henry G Friesen International Prize in Health Research. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

13 December 2016

16 prizes awarded for top abstracts and posters at CSCI-CITAC Young Investigators Forum

The Banting Research Foundation awarded 16 prizes for top oral abstracts and posters at the Young Investigators Forum at the 2016 annual meetings of the Canadian Society for Clinical Investigation (CSCI) and the Clinician Investigator Trainee Association of Canada (CITAC). READ THE WHOLE STORY »

30 September 2016

Banting's Legacy - Art & Science of Discovery

banting-oil-sketches

In September 2016, the Banting Research Foundation welcomed 60 guests to a celebration of Banting’s Legacy, the Art and Science of Discovery. Frederick Banting’s accomplishments as a scientist and an artist inspired the theme for the evening. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

26 August 2016

Moriarty lab shows how Lyme disease bacteria spread through the body

Tara Moriarty PhD and PhD student Rhodaba Ebady at the University of Toronto have developed an imaging system that is able to show how bacterial cells move through blood vessels to infect other parts of the body. Using the bacteria that causes Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, they showed how bacterial cells attach themselves to the inner surface of blood vessels with tether-like structures, grabbing and releasing to move themselves along without being swept away by the forces of blood flow. Knowing the mechanism of this movement is a critical step in the development of therapeutics to treat Lyme disease and other similar infections. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

27 July 2016

2016 Discovery Award Recipients

Congratulations to the Banting Research Foundation 2016 Discovery Award recipients. Six grants were funded in the 2016 competition out of 50 applications. The successful Discovery Award recipients are:

26 July 2016

Jeanette Boudreau, PhD

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University

Directing natural killer cell cytotoxicity to the tumour’s susceptibilities

Boudreau_lab
Natural killer (NK) cells are white blood cells that kill tumours. The potential of each NK cell to kill tumours is counterbalanced by its ability to be inhibited by healthy cells through its inhibitory receptors. Dr Boudreau aims to tip the balance in favour of NK killing, rather than inhibition, when they encounter a tumour cell. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

26 July 2016

Christopher Dennison, PhD

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta

Impact severity metric for focal head and diffuse brain injury

(Photo: Richard Siemens)

(Photo: Richard Siemens)

Whether or not today’s helmets protect the wearer from mild diffuse brain injuries, sometimes referred to as concussions, is the topic of intense debate. One of the primary venues for this debate is in the helmet standards and certification community. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

26 July 2016

Jeffrey Gagnon, PhD

Department of Biology, Laurentian University

Investigating the role of H2S in the regulation of ghrelin secretion

Jeffrey Gagnon with student in lab

Jeffrey Gagnon with student in lab


Ghrelin, a hormone produced in the endocrine cells of the stomach, regulates several aspects of metabolic health, including appetite and energy storage. Recently, meals high in the amino acid cysteine have been shown to reduce ghrelin secretion. Foods rich in this amino acid also lead to increased production of the bioactive gas molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S). H2S has been shown to regulate many aspects of health, including inflammation, cardiovascular health, and endocrine control. Dr Gagnon believes that ghrelin cells can metabolize cysteine to produce their own H2S, and that this H2S reduces ghrelin secretion and reduces appetite. He will first demonstrate how H2S and its precursor amino acid L-cysteine can regulate ghrelin secretion using several ghrelin producing cell models. He will then examine how this amino acid, and its gas metabolite, can suppress food intake through the suppression of ghrelin. This work will provide important information on how ghrelin and appetite is regulated by H2S and may lead to new strategies in weight management.

26 July 2016

Kaitlyn McLachlan, PhD

Department of Psychology, University of Guelph

Evaluating novel neurobiomarkers in the identification of adults with FASD using portable eye tracking and EEG technology

Individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) are overrepresented in the criminal justice system. There is an urgent need to identify neurobiomarkers of FASD and individuals at risk in order to reduce recidivism and the resulting high social, health, and economic costs. Novel use of neurotechnologies, including portable eye movement control tracking and EEG, may offer a window into the brain and aid in the identification of patterns of deficits in offenders with FASD. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

26 July 2016

Noam Miller, PhD

Department of Psychology, Wilfrid Laurier University

Exploring neural mechanisms of social behavior using zebrafish (Danio rerio)

(l to r) Ramy Ayoub, Mackenzie Schultz, Noam Miller, Chelsey Damphousse

(l to r) Ramy Ayoub, Mackenzie Schultz, Noam Miller, Chelsey Damphousse

This research study uses zebrafish, a small freshwater species of fish commonly used in genetic and developmental research, to explore the mechanisms of social behavior. Zebrafish spend the majority of their time in groups and have complex social interactions, including learning from each other, making collective decisions about where to search for food, and communicating about the presence of predators. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

26 July 2016

Roxane Paulin, PhD

Department of Medicine, Université Laval

Targeting ErbB2 by TAK-165 reverses pulmonary hypertension in vitro and in vivo

Roxane Paulin and her Groupe de Recherche en Hypertension Pulmonaire, Université Laval

Roxane Paulin and her Groupe de Recherche en Hypertension Pulmonaire, Université Laval

In pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lungs), cells forming the walls of arteries in the lungs proliferate like cancer cells, narrowing the arteries and making it difficult for blood to pass through. There is also evidence of inflammation, similar to that in infections, and evidence of insulin resistance, as in diabetes. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

16 May 2016

Janet Rossant, PhD, invested to the Order of Canada

Governor General David Johnston invests Dr Janet Rossant as a Companion of the Order of Canada. (Photo: Adrian Wyld /Canadian Press)

Governor General David Johnston invests Dr Janet Rossant as a Companion of the Order of Canada. (Photo: Adrian Wyld /Canadian Press)


Dr Janet Rossant was invested into the Order of Canada in a ceremony at Rideau Hall on May 13, 2016. She was appointed in May 2015 to the rank of Companion of the Order of Canada, the highest level within the Order, for advancing the global understanding of embryo development and stem cell biology, and for her national and international leadership in health science.
Earlier in 2016, Dr Rossant was awarded the 2016 Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research, and in 2015, received the prestigious Canada Gairdner Wightman Award for her outstanding scientific contributions to developmental biology and for her exceptional international leadership in stem cell biology and policy-making, and in advancing research programs for children’s illnesses.
Dr Rossant is internationally renowned as a developmental biologist, known for her studies of the genes that control embryonic development. Originally from the UK, she came to Canada in 1977 to assume a faculty position at Brock University. She moved to the University of Toronto in 1985, at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital and then at the Hospital for Sick Children, where she was Chief of Research.
While an assistant professor at Brock University in 1983, Dr Rossant received a grant from the Banting Research Foundation for her early research in developmental biology. She says, “the early support of the Banting Research Foundation was very helpful in setting my course towards the Gairdner Wightman Award.”

19 January 2016

2015 Friesen Prize Public Lecture

L to R: Dr Mario Pinto (President, NSERC), Dr Alex MacKenzie (Senior Scientist, CHEO Research Institute), Mr Paul Kennedy (Host, CBC Radio One “Ideas”), Dr Michel Chrétien (2015 Friends of CIHR Founders’ Award), Dr John Floras (immediate Past President, Banting Research Foundation), Dr Reinhart Reithmeier (Special Advisor to Dean of Graduate Studies, University of Toronto), Dr Mona Nemer (VP Research, University of Ottawa), Nobel laureate Sir Paul Nurse (2015 Friesen Prizewinner, Chief Executive & Director of the Francis Crick Institute, UK), Dr Aubie Angel (President, Friends of CIHR), Dr Rosie Goldstein (Vice-Principal Research & International Relations, McGill University), Dr Lorne Tyrrell (Director, Li Ka Shing Institute of Virology, University of Alberta), Dr Catharine Whiteside (President, Banting Research Foundation), Dr Henry G Friesen (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, University of Manitoba), Dr Bruce McManus (CEO, PROOF Centre of Excellence, UBC), Dr Maryse Lassonde (President, Royal Society of Canada). (Photo credit: Martin Lipman/ FCIHR)

L to R: Dr Mario Pinto (President, NSERC), Dr Alex MacKenzie (Senior Scientist, CHEO Research Institute), Mr Paul Kennedy (Host, CBC Radio One “Ideas”), Dr Michel Chrétien (2015 Friends of CIHR Founders’ Award), Dr John Floras (immediate Past President, Banting Research Foundation), Dr Reinhart Reithmeier (Special Advisor to Dean of Graduate Studies, University of Toronto), Dr Mona Nemer (VP Research, University of Ottawa), Nobel laureate Sir Paul Nurse (2015 Friesen Prizewinner, Chief Executive & Director of the Francis Crick Institute, UK), Dr Aubie Angel (President, Friends of CIHR), Dr Rosie Goldstein (Vice-Principal Research & International Relations, McGill University), Dr Lorne Tyrrell (Director, Li Ka Shing Institute of Virology, University of Alberta), Dr Catharine Whiteside (President, Banting Research Foundation), Dr Henry G Friesen (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, University of Manitoba), Dr Bruce McManus (CEO, PROOF Centre of Excellence, UBC), Dr Maryse Lassonde (President, Royal Society of Canada). (Photo credit: Martin Lipman/ FCIHR)

Following Sir Paul Nurse’s December 7, 2015 Friesen Prize Lecture at the University of Ottawa entitled “The Fundamental Significance of Discovery Science in the Creative Process,” distinguished leaders in health science and education gathered for Roundtable Discussions concerning the roles of discovery research of graduate science education in the health of Canadians, co-sponsored by the Banting Research Foundation, the Royal Canadian Institute for Science and Friends of CIHR.

The proceeding of the Policy Roundtables from the 2015 Friesen Prize Program are available here (19MB):
friesen-roundtables-2015-ottawa-final

21 December 2015

Annual Report 2015

2015 Annual Report for the year ended June 30 2015.

Banting Research Foundation
Founded in 1925 by supporters of Frederick Banting,
1923 Nobel laureate for the discovery of insulin


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