26 July 2016

Jeanette Boudreau, PhD

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University

Directing natural killer cell cytotoxicity to the tumour’s susceptibilities

Boudreau_lab
Natural killer (NK) cells are white blood cells that kill tumours. The potential of each NK cell to kill tumours is counterbalanced by its ability to be inhibited by healthy cells through its inhibitory receptors. Dr Boudreau aims to tip the balance in favour of NK killing, rather than inhibition, when they encounter a tumour cell. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

26 July 2016

Christopher Dennison, PhD

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta

Impact severity metric for focal head and diffuse brain injury

(Photo: Richard Siemens)

(Photo: Richard Siemens)

Whether or not today’s helmets protect the wearer from mild diffuse brain injuries, sometimes referred to as concussions, is the topic of intense debate. One of the primary venues for this debate is in the helmet standards and certification community. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

26 July 2016

Jeffrey Gagnon, PhD

Department of Biology, Laurentian University

Investigating the role of H2S in the regulation of ghrelin secretion

Jeffrey Gagnon with student in lab

Jeffrey Gagnon with student in lab


Ghrelin, a hormone produced in the endocrine cells of the stomach, regulates several aspects of metabolic health, including appetite and energy storage. Recently, meals high in the amino acid cysteine have been shown to reduce ghrelin secretion. Foods rich in this amino acid also lead to increased production of the bioactive gas molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S). H2S has been shown to regulate many aspects of health, including inflammation, cardiovascular health, and endocrine control. Dr Gagnon believes that ghrelin cells can metabolize cysteine to produce their own H2S, and that this H2S reduces ghrelin secretion and reduces appetite. He will first demonstrate how H2S and its precursor amino acid L-cysteine can regulate ghrelin secretion using several ghrelin producing cell models. He will then examine how this amino acid, and its gas metabolite, can suppress food intake through the suppression of ghrelin. This work will provide important information on how ghrelin and appetite is regulated by H2S and may lead to new strategies in weight management.

26 July 2016

Kaitlyn McLachlan, PhD

Department of Psychology, University of Guelph

Evaluating novel neurobiomarkers in the identification of adults with FASD using portable eye tracking and EEG technology

Individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) are overrepresented in the criminal justice system. There is an urgent need to identify neurobiomarkers of FASD and individuals at risk in order to reduce recidivism and the resulting high social, health, and economic costs. Novel use of neurotechnologies, including portable eye movement control tracking and EEG, may offer a window into the brain and aid in the identification of patterns of deficits in offenders with FASD. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

26 July 2016

Noam Miller, PhD

Department of Psychology, Wilfrid Laurier University

Exploring neural mechanisms of social behavior using zebrafish (Danio rerio)

(l to r) Ramy Ayoub, Mackenzie Schultz, Noam Miller, Chelsey Damphousse

(l to r) Ramy Ayoub, Mackenzie Schultz, Noam Miller, Chelsey Damphousse

This research study uses zebrafish, a small freshwater species of fish commonly used in genetic and developmental research, to explore the mechanisms of social behavior. Zebrafish spend the majority of their time in groups and have complex social interactions, including learning from each other, making collective decisions about where to search for food, and communicating about the presence of predators. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

26 July 2016

Roxane Paulin, PhD

Department of Medicine, Université Laval

Targeting ErbB2 by TAK-165 reverses pulmonary hypertension in vitro and in vivo

Roxane Paulin and her Groupe de Recherche en Hypertension Pulmonaire, Université Laval

Roxane Paulin and her Groupe de Recherche en Hypertension Pulmonaire, Université Laval

In pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lungs), cells forming the walls of arteries in the lungs proliferate like cancer cells, narrowing the arteries and making it difficult for blood to pass through. There is also evidence of inflammation, similar to that in infections, and evidence of insulin resistance, as in diabetes. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

24 August 2015

Grant Recipients 2015

In 2015, the following early-career researchers received Banting Research Foundation Discovery Awards:

Jeffrey Chen, PhD, University of Saskatchewan
Towards a next generation of superior BCG tuberculosis vaccines

Jeremy Hirota, PhD, University of British Columbia
A 3D-printed human airway model for studying respiratory mucosal immune responses

Petra Kienesberger, PhD, Dalhousie University
Role of the adipokine autotaxin in obesity-associated insulin resistance

Morgan Langille, PhD, Dalhousie University
Design and implementation of a human microbiome interaction database

Joon Lee, PhD, University of Waterloo
Personalized predictive analytics based on electronic medical data and patient similarity metrics

Catherine Martel, PhD, Université de Montréal
Lymphatic vessel function in atherosclerosis

Michael Suits, PhD, Wilfrid Laurier University
Protein structure-function relationships in periodontal disease

21 August 2015

Jeffrey Chen, PhD

VIDO-InterVac, University of Saskatchewan

Towards a next generation of superior BCG tuberculosis vaccines

(Photo: Trenna Brusky, VIDO InterVac)

(Photo: Trenna Brusky, VIDO InterVac)

Tuberculosis is a serious global health problem, with one-third of the world’s population having been infected by the infectious agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The only available tuberculosis vaccine, live M. bovis BCG vaccine, has an excellent record in protecting infants, but works poorly in adolescents and adults. Therefore, better tuberculosis vaccines are urgently required. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

21 August 2015

Jeremy Hirota, PhD

Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia

A 3D-printed human airway model for studying respiratory mucosal immune responses

Jeremy Hirota

Jeremy Hirota

Exposure to allergens and air pollutants in the air we breathe can lead to “lung attacks” in individuals with lung diseases, but it is unclear how this happens and what we can do to stop it. Dr Hirota’s research group studies how exposure to inhaled allergens and air pollution causes irritation and swelling (inflammation) in the lungs, leading to difficulty breathing, and how this causes lung attacks. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

21 August 2015

Petra Kienesberger, PhD

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University

Role of the adipokine autotaxin in obesity-associated insulin resistance

Kienesberger_cropped 300w
Insulin resistance, a major complication of obesity, is a condition where tissues such as skeletal muscle become unresponsive to the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin. Insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes, which is associated with a shorter life expectancy. Fat tissue releases proteins that influence insulin resistance in obesity. One of these recently identified fat-derived proteins is autotaxin. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

21 August 2015

Morgan Langille, PhD

Department of Pharmacology, Dalhousie University

Design and implementation of a human microbiome interaction database

It is becoming increasingly apparent that the microbes living on and in our bodies, called the human microbiome, are important for human health. These microbes help with the digestion of food, defend against unwanted pathogens, stimulate and keep our immune systems in check, and synthesize essential vitamins. In addition, changes in the microbiome have been linked to various diseases and health concerns such as obesity, irritable bowel disease, diabetes, colon cancer, and various autoimmune diseases. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

21 August 2015

Joon Lee, PhD

School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo

Personalized predictive analytics based on electronic medical data and patient similarity metrics

A regular group meeting of the Health Data Science Lab at the University of Waterloo

A regular group meeting of the Health Data Science Lab at the University of Waterloo


As hospitals and doctors’ offices in Canada rapidly adopt electronic medical records (EMRs), the enormous clinical value of ever-increasing EMR data is receiving the spotlight. In particular, massive EMR data can facilitate personalized medical treatment through identification and analysis of past patients who are similar to a current patient. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

21 August 2015

Catherine Martel, PhD

Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal/ Montreal Heart Institute Research Centre

Lymphatic vessel function in atherosclerosis

Martel lab group, left to right, François Dallaire, Andreea Milasan, Catherine Martel (Photo: Jonathan B. Béland)

Martel lab group, left to right, François Dallaire, Andreea Milasan, Catherine Martel (Photo: Jonathan B. Béland)

High blood cholesterol is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is called “good cholesterol” because it transports cholesterol away from tissues, such as the blood vessel walls, carrying cholesterol through the blood circulation for eventual excretion through the intestines. Unfortunately, the clinical outcomes aiming at increasing levels of circulating HDL have not been as successful as expected READ THE WHOLE STORY »

21 August 2015

Michael Suits, PhD

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Wilfrid Laurier University

Protein structure-function relationships in periodontal disease

Suits_cropped 300wIn the mouth, a wide variety of microorganisms are embedded in biofilms that contribute to periodontal diseases such as gum disease and tooth decay. To understand the contribution of a consortium of periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, to biofilm formation and dental diseases, Dr Suits’ research group will clone, produce and isolate ~40-50 proteins of interest for structure-function characterization. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

17 July 2014

Grant Recipients 2014

In 2014, the following early-career researchers received Banting Research Foundation Discovery Awards:

Benoît Arsenault, Université Laval
Impact of a lifestyle modification program on high-density lipoprotein function

Yannick Doyon, Université Laval
In vivo genome editing as a novel class of human therapeutics to treat pediatric metabolic disorders

Jennifer Heisz, McMaster University
Examining the dose-response relationship between physical exercise and cognitive function in older adults

Jeffrey Leyton, Université de Sherbrooke
An advanced development in targeted radiation against muscle invasive migrating bladder cancer cells

Ewa Niechwiej-Szwedo, University of Waterloo
The role of binocular vision in the development of fine motor skills

Emanuel Rosonina, York University
Regulation of transcription and splicing factors by sumoylation

17 July 2014

Benoît Arsenault, PhD

Department of Medicine, Université Laval

Impact of a lifestyle modification program on high-density lipoprotein function

Benoit_microscope_cropped
Plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, often referred to as “the good cholesterol”, are inversely associated with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes risk. Several lines of evidence suggest that these associations could be explained by the fact that HDL particles promote macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport and stimulate insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

17 July 2014

Yannick Doyon, PhD

Department of Molecular Medicine, Université Laval

In vivo genome editing as a novel class of human therapeutics to treat pediatric metabolic disorders

Yannick Doyon and his lab group

Yannick Doyon and his lab group, left to right, Alexandre Raymond-Fleury, Caroline Huard, Yannick Doyon, Jeremy Loehr, Nicolas Lacroix-Pepin


Genetic disorders in children are individually rare but collectively frequent, affecting the lives of approximately 500,000 children in Canada. They often are serious, life threatening or fatal, but because each rare disease affects a relatively small population few treatments have been developed. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

17 July 2014

Jennifer Heisz, PhD

Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University

Examining the dose-response relationship between physical exercise and cognitive function in older adults

Jennifer Heisz talks about her research at a recent Canadian Foundation for Innovation funding announcement (Photo: Ron Scheffler)

Jennifer Heisz talks about her research at a recent Canadian Foundation for Innovation funding announcement (Photo: Ron Scheffler)

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, causing severe cognitive impairment and interfering with daily life. As the population ages, the number of Canadians living with dementia is projected to double within a generation to affect 1.1 million people and cost Canada’s healthcare system in excess of $150 billion. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

17 July 2014

Jeffrey Leyton, PhD

Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke

An advanced development in targeted radiation against muscle invasive migrating bladder cancer cells

Jeffrey Leyton and co-workers

Jeffrey Leyton and co-workers

Bladder cancer affects thousands of Canadians on an annual basis. Unfortunately, bladder cancer remains one of the most difficult cancers to manage. The treatment options currently available to patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer have remained essentially unchanged. For patients with advanced or metastatic disease, bladder cancer is lethal within 2 years. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

17 July 2014

Ewa Niechwiej-Szwedo, PhD

Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo

The role of binocular vision in the development of fine motor skills

A young research subject performs motor tasks while her eye and hand movements are recorded. The analysis of kinematic trajectories will provide insight into the development of hand-eye coordination.

A young research subject performs motor tasks while her eye and hand movements are recorded. The analysis of kinematic trajectories will provide insight into the development of hand-eye coordination.

Seeing in depth is essential for guiding purposeful movements, such as reaching and grasping for toys or food, catching a ball or using tools to accomplish complex tasks. Binocular vision provides important cues for 3D depth perception. However, 3-5% of children with amblyopia or strabismus have abnormal binocular vision. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

Banting Research Foundation
Founded in 1925 by supporters of Frederick Banting,
1923 Nobel laureate for the discovery of insulin


Copyright © 2017 Banting Research Foundation


Log in
Website development by RNA Studio
Powered by WordPress & Atahualpa