17 July 2014

Emanuel Rosonina, PhD

Department of Biology, York University

Regulation of transcription and splicing factors by sumoylation

SUMO is a protein modification that plays important roles in regulating many cellular processes. Several proteins that are involved in neurodegenerative disease are modified by SUMO, and abnormal protein modifications by SUMO have been implicated in many types of cancer, indicating that tight regulation of this modification is critical to preventing disease. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

20 July 2013

Grant Recipients 2013

Pierre Lozach and team at the Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier

Pierre-Yves Lozach, recipient of a 2013 Banting Research Foundation grant, and his team at Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier

In 2013, grants were awarded to the following recipients:

Craig Bailey, University of Guelph
Nicotinic receptor signaling in a mouse model of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

David Chatenet, Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier
Design and synthesis of peptide inhibitors of PqsE as novel antibacterial therapeutics

Margaret K Hahn, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Central insulin to prevent olanzapine-induced adiposity: a rodent model

Pierre-Yves Lozach, Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier
Bunyavirus entry into mammalian cells

Dave Richard, Université Laval
Protein trafficking to the apical complex of the malaria parasite

Marie-Ève Tremblay, Université Laval
Microglial relationships with synaptic elements in Alzheimer’s disease

18 July 2013

Craig Bailey, PhD

Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Guelph

Nicotinic receptor signaling in a mouse model of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Neurons

Neurons

Chronic prenatal exposure to alcohol can produce a spectrum of adverse effects known collectively as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Although deficits in attention rank among the most common and persistent components of FASD, mechanisms underlying this behavioural outcome are not known. This project aims to determine mechanisms by which exposure to alcohol during development alters the brain’s attention systems. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2013

David Chatenet, PhD

Centre INRS–Institut Armand-Frappier

Design and synthesis of peptide inhibitors of PqsE as novel antibacterial therapeutics

David Chatenet with lab members

David Chatenet, recipient of a 2013 Banting Research Foundation grant, with lab colleagues at Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier. (Photo: Christian Fleury)

Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), a prevalent opportunistic human pathogen responsible for morbidity and mortality among individuals suffering from cystic fibrosis, is notorious for its high resistance to antibiotic treatments. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2013

Margaret K Hahn, MD, PhD

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Central insulin to prevent olanzapine-induced adiposity: a rodent model

Portrait of Margaret Hahn, 2013

Margaret K Hahn, recipient of a 2013 Banting Research Foundation grant

Atypical antipsychotic (AAP) medications, the mainstay treatment for psychosis and schizophrenia, are defined by weight gain and metabolic problems that likely contribute to a 2-fold increase in cardiovascular (CV) deaths in this population. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2013

Pierre-Yves Lozach, PhD

Centre INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier

Bunyavirus entry into mammalian cells

Lozach Lab viral particles image

Lozach Lab image of viral particles (red = virus and green = cell membrane)

Bunyaviridae is a large family of viruses mainly transmitted by arthropods such as mosquitos and ticks. Many bunyaviruses are important pathogens in humans and livestock. Due to their mode of transmission, they are considered emerging agents of diseases. Unfortunately, bunyaviruses are understudied, which has contributed to an absence of treatments or vaccines approved for human use. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2013

Dave Richard, PhD

Département de microbiologie-infectiologie et d’immunologie, Université Laval

Protein trafficking to the apical complex of the malaria parasite

Richard Lab malaria cells image

Malaria merozoite in the process of invading a red blood cell, imaged using super resolution microscopy. Published in Cell Host and Microbe, 2011.

Malaria is one of the world’s most common infectious diseases, with approximately 274 million cases each year and 1 million deaths, and thus represents one of the most devastating global public health problems. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2013

Marie-Ève Tremblay, PhD

Département de médecine moléculaire, Université Laval

Microglial relationships with synaptic elements in Alzheimer’s disease

Tremblay Lab research image

Dynamic interactions between microglia (in yellow) and dendritic spines (in green), as imaged in real-time in vivo. Each frame was taken 5 minutes apart. The spines contacted by the microglial processes are shown by the white arrowheads, and those which are non-contacted by the red arrowheads. The scale bar corresponds to 5 microns. (Tremblay ME, Lowery RL, and Majewska AK (2010) Microglial interactions with synapses are modulated by visual experience. PLoS Biology 8:e1000527)

A series of recent discoveries have challenged our view of microglia, the brain immune cells, showing unexpected roles in the active maintenance of neuronal circuits throughout the lifespan. Contributing to this nascent field of investigation, this project aims at exploring the relevance of these new roles in Alzheimer’s disease, the most common cause of dementia affecting over 35 million people worldwide. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

19 July 2012

Grant Recipients 2012

In 2012, grants were awarded to the following recipients:

Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, University of Toronto
A universal development platform for the BBDMR

Alexandre Douplik, Ryerson University
Surface enhanced Raman fiber sensor for endoscopic early detection of tumor-related biomolecules in gastroenterology

Carl Ernst, McGill University
Functional analysis of the 16p11.2 locus using patient-derived induced-pluripotent stem cells

Dennis Jensen, McGill University
Banting Research Foundation/ Rx&D Health Research Foundation Award
Physiological mechanisms of dyspnea relief and improved exercise tolerance after treatment with oral morphine in patients with advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Martin Lévesque, Université Laval
Molecular mechanisms of axon guidance mediated by PlexinC1 in dopamine neurons axonal projections

Michelle Scott, Université de Sherbrooke
Banting Research Foundation/ Rx&D Health Research Foundation Award
Characterization of a novel function of small RNAs in alternative splicing

18 July 2012

Alexandre Douplik, PhD

Physics Department, Ryerson University

Surface-enhanced Raman fiber sensor for endoscopic early detection of tumor-related biomolecules in gastroenterology

The goal of the project is development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy fiber probes for high sensitive and rapid non-invasive diagnostics including malignancy detection. Optical sampling of biological molecules can detect specific Raman “fingerprints” including cancer “signatures” with high accuracy. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2012

Carl Ernst, PhD

Department of Psychiatry, McGill University

Functional analysis of the 16p11.2 locus using patient-derived induced-pluripotent stem cells

Large deletions of DNA on chromosome 16 are associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in about 1% of all Canadians with autism, and many more Canadians with intellectual disability. I have recruited and clinically assessed two independent families carrying the chromosome 16 deletion as well as unrelated control subjects. I have made, fully characterized, and validated stem cells from each family member, derived from their skin. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2012

Dennis Jensen, PhD

Department of Kinesiology & Physical Education, McGill University

Physiological mechanisms of dyspnea relief and improved exercise tolerance after treatment with oral morphine in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive disease of the lungs and airways, causing shortness of breath (dyspnea) and exercise intolerance. Conventional efforts to alleviate these symptoms have focused on dilating the airways (eg, bronchodilators), reducing the drive to breathe (eg, supplemental oxygen), or both of these in combination. Nevertheless, many COPD patients remain incapacitated by dyspnea and intolerant to exercise, despite receiving optimal therapy for management of their disease. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2012

Martin Lévesque, PhD

Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Université Laval

Molecular mechanisms of axon guidance mediated by PlexinC1 in dopamine neuron axonal projections

Lévesque lab research image

Midbrain explant containing dopaminergic neurons growing in collagen gel matrix. This assay is used to study the response of growing axons to guidance molecules.

Degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons (mDA) is the principal cause of Parkinson’s disease. Grafts of dopaminergic neurons newly generated from stem cells represent a promising therapeutic avenue. However, inappropriate re-innervation of the grafted neurons represents a major factor limiting success in transplantation studies. Our previous work has identified PlexinC1 as a potential important candidate that mediates appropriate innervation of dopaminergic axons. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

18 July 2012

Michelle Scott, PhD

Department of Biochemistry, Université de Sherbrooke

Characterization of a novel function of small RNAs in alternative splicing

Michelle Scott

Michelle Scott, recipient of a 2012 Banting Research Foundation grant

The process of alternative splicing allows the production of multiple distinct proteins from a single gene, in a manner that can be cell-type specific. Alternative splicing requires an extensive and complex regulation. Diverse human diseases can be caused by mutations resulting in splicing deregulation including cystic fibrosis, progeria, spinal muscular atrophy, and many forms of cancer, highlighting the importance of a comprehensive understanding of this regulation. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

1 August 2011

Grant Recipients 2011

In 2011, grants were awarded to the following recipients:
Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, University of Toronto
DNA sequencing sample prep suite

Marcelo Berlim, McGill University
Remediating decision-making deficits in depressed subjects at high risk for suicide with transcranial magnetic stimulation

Simon Lees, Lakehead University
The IL-6 paradox in the development of insulin resistance

Tara Moriarty, University of Toronto
Vascular adhesion mechanisms of the Lyme disease spirochete

Takako Niikura, Simon Fraser University
Regulation of amyloid beta metabolism

Jonathan Perreault, INRS – Institut Armand-Frappier
Regulation in the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia by the MAEB RNA motif

1 August 2011

Marcelo Berlim, MD, MSc

Department of Psychiatry, McGill University

Remediating decision-making deficits in depressed subjects at high risk for suicide with transcranial magnetic stimulation

We aim to assess whether high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, a safe and non-invasive method for modulating the activity of specific brain regions, when applied over the left region of the forehead (ie, the orbitofrontal cortex) of depressed subjects at high risk for suicide is able to improve decision-making deficits which may predispose these subjects to suicidal behavior. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

1 August 2011

Simon J Lees, PhD

Faculty of Medicine, Lakehead University

The IL-6 paradox in the development of insulin resistance

Paradoxically, elevated IL-6 is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, while at the same time strong evidence supports the notion that IL-6 may facilitate improved insulin signaling as a result of physical activity. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

1 August 2011

Tara Moriarty, PhD

Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto

Vascular adhesion mechanisms of the Lyme disease spirochete

Blood-borne spread (dissemination) of pathogens is a critical step in the development of serious infectious disease, and is responsible for most of the mortality due to bacterial infection. The dissemination mechanisms of many bacterial pathogens are largely unknown. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

1 August 2011

Takako Niikura, DVM, PhD

Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University

Regulation of amyloid beta metabolism

In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), progressive brain atrophy and dementia appear because of neuronal cell death and synaptic dysfunction in brains. Amyloid beta plays a central toxic role in AD pathogenesis. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

1 August 2011

Jonathan Perreault, PhD

INRS – Institut Armand Frappier

Regulation in the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia by the MAEB RNA motif

Aside from their role in storing hereditary information, DNA and RNA are now known to have many more functions. Living organisms have a plethora of RNAs that control numerous processes in cells. One such RNA, named MAEB, was recently found by computer-aided searches in the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia. READ THE WHOLE STORY »

Banting Research Foundation
Founded in 1925 by supporters of Frederick Banting,
1923 Nobel laureate for the discovery of insulin


Copyright © 2017 Banting Research Foundation


Log in
Website development by RNA Studio
Powered by WordPress & Atahualpa